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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
have been sent to polls across the country, invited by a number of civil rights groups, including the naacp who says there is an effort to suppress minority at the polls. the group sending the observers, the organization for security and cooperation in europe insisting its people will not interfere or influence elections in any way. some american officials are not taking any chances and guaranteeing that they will not. well, let us pause for a moment to consider what the mayor of somerville, massachusetts, has done. getting -- for getting america is the land of the free, including jealously protected -- protection of our first amendment rights, the mayor of the small city, 76,000 people in massachusetts has decided to outlaw the word illegal in connection with the phrase immigrant. they don't want to upset anybody. i said immigrant and illegal in different phrases. we don't know what he thinks it should be instead. we do know, the mayor has just made support illegal illegal. up next, it is an all-out battle for ohio. both candddates campaigning today. can the election be one anywh
with civil rights. grant was the last of the lincoln republicans. one point i make is grant was the last president, the only president between abraham lincoln and lyndon johnson who took civil-rights for african-americans seriously. after grant left office the former slaves were left to the tender mercies of the majority of the south and quickly they were shoved to the side. >> don't ask the question if you don't want bill to answer it thoroughly. >> i do accept yes and no, multiple choice questions. >> we only have three minutes and there's a serious deadline so a brief question. >> you said you want to write history or biography. when i read your benjamin franklin biography you sound like a particle american, the first to the modern in some sense. very different people speaking. , who is the first american in the sense that he or she has attitudes like we do and writing biographies and things like that between 1620, and 1770. >> i am not sure i understand the question. who is the first american? >> who would you think after early colonization would have american attitudes that we recog
form of tax increase. we should lead by setting a high example for civil liberties and civil rights and due process and rule of law which is why we should close guantanamo and restore habeas corpus. i know he'll be able to help me turn the page on the ugly partisanship in washington so we can bring democrats and republicans together to pass an agenda that works for the american people. jon: well, that was then-senator barack obama promising big change during his 2008 successful presidential campaign. those promises you just heard pretty much went unfulfilled over the past four years including his vow to work with the other side of the aisle. our next guest says if president obama had lived up to his promises, things would look very different right now. fred barnes writing in "the weekly standard," quote: if he had done in his first term what he now vows to accomplish in his second term, he'd be this a far stronger position to win re-election next tuesday. he might have been a shoo-in. fred, you know, people have short memories when it comes to re-election time. take us back to four
because they've been right at "the new york times" jobs to do the work of human rights and civil liberties groups. that got me thinking, whose job is at? if it's not going to be the times they are going to shut up private plans, at least sort of a vacuum. i would've thought responsible government would leave that felt by the government as opposed to by law professors and centers for national security. so as i said at the beginning, i do agree with john at the debate is not in any significant regard difference in so far as the tensions from what has been really for the better part of the last seven years. i do think that we are leaning more toward a lack of public accountability and at least uncomfortable with. and maybe that's just because i'm a law professor who happens to spend time in the trenches like these guys. >> i think it's a little uncomfortable to talk about the pendulum swing back when the actual accountability for so much that has happened has been occurred. the question has been life to the ngos, the think tanks, the press committees are to figure out who exactly is responsib
wrote, it's not "the new york times"' job to do the work of human rights and civil liberties groups. and that got me thinking, well, then whose job is it? you know, if it's not going to be the times, and if you're going to shut out private plaintiffs from pursuing this information, i don't know, you know, that leaves a sort of a vacuum. and i would have thought that responsible government would believe that the vacuum should be filled by the government, right? as opposed to by law professors and, you know, senators or national security. i do, as i said in the beginning, i do agree with john that the debate is not in any significant regard different, um, insofar as the tensions, um, from what it's been really for the better part of the post-world war -- the better part of the last 70 years. but i do think that we are leaning more toward a lack of public accountability than at least i'm comfortable with, um, and, you know, maybe that's just because i'm a, you know, law professor who hasn't spent time in the trenches like these guys. >> you know, i think it's a little uncomfortable to
a criminal law and civil law background. he was confident. he had the right work ethic. everything about it was a perfect fit for us. remember, if you have a civil law firm with a contingency fee incentive in a case like that involving a state, you miss issues that are important to the state of alabama. one issue in the bp case, which is critical to state, is that the judge's decision to apply federal maritime law to the penalties that would apply if they recovered as opposed to state penalties. alabama has significant state penalties for these events. the judge decided to go with the federal statute. that's on appeal in the 5th circuit because we feel like in criminal law terms if they manufacture poisen in atlanta, sends it to birmingham to poisen someone, the state has jurisdiction over that. that's a simple analogy, but that's the state criminal law state authority power issue that's at stake in this litigation, and an in-house lawyer who understands that is particularly important in cases like that. the other thing that doug mentioned, and the question was where do you get your info
in investigating. it's not the "new york times'" job to do the work of human rights and civil liberty groups. that got me thinking. well, then, whose job is it? if it's not the times', and you shut out plaintiffs in the information; that leaves a vacuum, and i thought the responsible thing would be to fill it by the government opposed to law professors and centers for national security. as i said in the beginning, i agree with john that the debate is not in any significant regard different in as far as the tensions what's been really for the better part of the better part of the last 70 years, but i think that we are leaning more towards a lack of public accountability than i'm comfortable with, and, you know, maybe that's just because i'm a, you know, a law professor not in the trenches like these guys. >> it's uncomfortable to talking about the pendulum swing back when the actual accountability for so much that has happened has not occurred, and the question has been left to the ngos, the think tanks, the press to sort of figure out, well, who exactly is responsible for braining that accou
doesn't make sense. charles: the notion of a more civil tone within the discourse could be the overarching message. >> it is a funny start. charles: you're right about kid rock saying a lot of things the majority of americans, but i would not put the deer on the front. that was weird. the highlight reel is next. charles: we have some breaking news. think about this. the labor department saying they have not made a decision on whether to delay friday's jobs report. that is huge. the next number will be revised higher. there is no way that number was real. what if all this economic data is pushed past the election. >> that is exceedingly rare for the labor department to delay or even discussed delaying it. talking about how hurricane sandy may lower gdp which is already getting along at 2%. we could go into negative territory. they are saying sizable negative impact from hurricane sandy. watch out for that. >> plus, what this could do to consumer confidence. the confidence index, this could really affect it. playing with this politically, bad for the obama administration.
to tolerate it and sort of equated it to the first amendment. that is never going to be my approach to civil liberties or equality. i am proud that we overturned don't ask, don't tell. and yes, marriage and equality is the right thing to do. >> rep wilson? >> the alpha lincolnville that you have sponsored, federal funding from schools, if there is believed in the schools, bullying for any reason is an unacceptable. i think that is best dealt with by teachers and parents and authorities, not by cutting funds from a school if there is bullying going on in the school. that is the position i take. like you, i am a parent. we do not need washington to solve those problems for us. >> rep? >> actually, when congress when wilson was in congress, she helped pass the no child left behind legislation, and it did just that. it took away power from our schools and put it into a one size fits all structure that does not teach new mexico kids. i would repeal the legislation. >> i'm going to do something a little different here, and give each of you a chance for one more were bottle on this issue, starting
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)